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Beyond the Walled CityColonial Exclusion in Havana$
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Guadalupe García

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780520286030

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520286030.001.0001

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North Americans in Havana

North Americans in Havana

Chapter:
(p.171) Chapter 6 North Americans in Havana
Source:
Beyond the Walled City
Author(s):

Guadalupe García

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520286030.003.0007

Chapter 6 delves into the North American occupation of the city. Scholars have often attributed the explosion of public works projects during this period to a defining phase of twentieth-century urban development introduced by the United States. This chapter argues, however, that the terms of urban development were established during colonial rule with the practices discussed in the earlier chapters. It reprises the intimate connection between urban development and empire and argues that this was the basis for Cuba’s seamless transition from colonial rule to neocolonial enclave. The transition marked a pivotal moment that illustrates how urban rule sustained—and eventually put an end to—a three-hundred-year-old project to secure a space of Spanish civilization in the Caribbean.

Keywords:   Havana, colonialism, independence, empire, urban development, Cuba

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