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Making It CrazyAn Ethnography of Psychiatric Clients in an American Community$
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Sue Estroff

Print publication date: 1985

Print ISBN-13: 9780520054516

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520054516.001.0001

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Clients and Pact-a Description

Clients and Pact-a Description

Chapter:
(p.42) 4 Clients and Pact-a Description
Source:
Making It Crazy
Author(s):

Sue E. Estroff

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520054516.003.0004

This chapter describes the primary subjects and the most important components of their environment during the research for this book: the Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT) program and staff, other clients, and the community setting. A demographic profile of clients is offered, including pertinent aspects of their psychiatric histories and clinical designations. Staff composition is reviewed, and the PACT treatment modality and philosophy are both discussed. Important features of the setting are explained and the clients are characterized according to their conceptions and use of time, space, and information. Forty-three persons comprised the group of clients studied for this project. PACT may represent the clients' best opportunity to achieve relative independence. Public touching between staff and clients was nearly nonexistent. Staff and clients touched and shared personal space more freely and more often with members of their own respective groups. Staff nurses and clients shared the most physical contact.

Keywords:   clients, Program of Assertive Community Treatment, staff, community setting, psychiatric histories, clinical designations, time, space, information

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