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Women, Culture, and Politics in Latin America$
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Seminar on Feminism & Culture in Latin America

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780520065536

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520065536.001.0001

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The Modernization of Femininity: Argentina, 1916–1926

The Modernization of Femininity: Argentina, 1916–1926

Chapter:
(p.74) Five The Modernization of Femininity: Argentina, 1916–1926
Source:
Women, Culture, and Politics in Latin America
Author(s):

Emilie Bergmann

Greenberg Janet

Gwen Kirkpatrick

Francine Masiello

Francesca Miller

Morello-Frosch Marta

Kathleen Newman

Mary Louise Pratt

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520065536.003.0005

This chapter investigates the media images of women between 1916 and 1926, as they reflect political anxieties of a changing society. It explores the modernization of femininity in relation to the historical context of social unrest and the entrance of women into the work force. It looks more closely at how Plus Ultra presented women and femininity in its opening pages. Plus Ultra never dealt with politics, but what it did run after the Semana Trágica suggested another kind of danger. A December issue of Caras y Caretas suggests that Argentine feminist leaders are different from the Americans. It is clear that by 1926, a gender modernity was sensed to be a threat by those who served either oligarchy or patriarchy, or both. The real modern woman was walking straight past the images of her modernity and her femininity, into the public space of nationality and politics.

Keywords:   femininity, modernization, media images, Plus Ultra, Caras y Caretas, Argentine feminist leaders, nationality, politics

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