Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Paths to Asian Medical Knowledge$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Charles Leslie and Allan Young

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780520073173

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520073173.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use (for details see http://california.universitypressscholarship.com/page/535/privacy-policy-and-legal-notice).date: 18 October 2017

Epistemological Issues and Changing Legitimation: Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Twentieth Century

Epistemological Issues and Changing Legitimation: Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Twentieth Century

Chapter:
(p.44) Two Epistemological Issues and Changing Legitimation: Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Twentieth Century
Source:
Paths to Asian Medical Knowledge
Author(s):

Charles Leslie

Allan Young

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520073173.003.0003

In China, the social ideology supporting the social system of the Imperial age constituted epistemological root, that is, the legitimizing context of traditional medicine. This chapter discusses the epistemological issues and changing legitimation of traditional Chinese medicine. With the breakdown of the traditional social structure, and with the demise of the traditional social ideologies supporting the Imperial age, and with the attempts to supply a new ideological basis to a changing social structure in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Chinese medicine lost its legitimizing environment. However, the body of knowledge identified as Chinese medicine today emerged as a result of fundamental changes in the social ideology and social structure of China at the beginning of the Imperial age. Its basically unchanged stability over exactly two millennia resulted from an unparalleled permanence of its legitimizing sociopolitical context during this time.

Keywords:   China, Chinese medicine, Imperial age, social ideology, traditional social structure

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.