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War of ShadowsThe Struggle for Utopia in the Peruvian Amazon$
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Michael Brown and Eduardo Fernandez

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780520074354

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520074354.001.0001

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Túpac Amaru

Túpac Amaru

Chapter:
(p.97) Five Túpac Amaru
Source:
War of Shadows
Author(s):

Michael F. Brown

Eduardo Fernandez

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520074354.003.0008

The guerrilla column making up the central front of the Movimiento de Izquierda Revolucionaria (MIR)'s three-front insurgency took the name Túpac Amaru after José Gabriel Condorcanqui, also known as Túpac Amaru II. The weaponry of the Túpac Amaru consisted of revolvers, shotguns, carbines, and a few light automatic rifles. The unfolding relations between the guerrillas of the Túpac Amaru and local peasant communities have inspired conflicting claims. Its members made a point of distinguishing themselves from peasants by their dress. Guillermo Lobatón Milla was the commander of the Túpac Amaru. The Túpac Amaru's acts of revolutionary “propaganda” soon led to a shooting war. Once the army took charge of the campaign against the MIR, it exercised total control over the dissemination of information. The Túpac Amaru escaped from the mountains toward the heavily forested foothills of the Río Sonomoro.

Keywords:   Túpac Amaru, Movimiento de Izquierda Revolucionaria, guerrilla, José Gabriel Condorcanqui, local peasant communities, Guillermo Lobatón Milla

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