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Beyond the PaleThe Jewish Encounter with Late Imperial Russia$
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Benjamin Nathans

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780520208308

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520208308.001.0001

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The Genesis of Selective Integration

The Genesis of Selective Integration

Chapter:
(p.45) Chapter 2 The Genesis of Selective Integration
Source:
Beyond the Pale
Author(s):

Benjamin Nathans

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520208308.003.0003

This chapter highlights the extent to which new Jewish elites, led by the wealthy Evzel Gintsburg and his entourage, helped shape a policy of “selective integration”, whereby certain categories of “useful” Jews were granted the rights and privileges of their Gentile counterparts according to social estate, including the right to permanent residence outside the Pale of Settlement. It notes that in this manner, a system of incentives was established which aimed at transforming both the internal life of Jewish communities and their external relations with the surrounding society. It situates selective integration in the context of Alexander II's Great Reforms, with particular attention to the social vocabulary of integration across lines of estate and ethnicity.

Keywords:   Evzel Gintsburg, selective integration, Gentile, Pale of Settlement, Alexander II's Great Reforms, estate and ethnicity

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