Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Rebel and a CauseCaryl Chessman and the Politics of the Death Penalty in Postwar California, 1948-1974$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Theodore Hamm

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780520224278

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520224278.001.0001

Show Summary Details

The Antithesis of Reform

The Antithesis of Reform

Chapter:
(p.11) Chapter One The Antithesis of Reform
Source:
Rebel and a Cause
Author(s):

Theodore Hamm

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520224278.003.0002

Movements against the death penalty have occurred regularly throughout the course of American history. At the beginning of the American Revolution, public officials began to criticize capital punishment, viewing it as antithetical to the new nation's republic deals. The shifting approaches to punishment during the three reform oriented eras reflected historic changes in popular explanations of criminal behavior. In relation to this matter, the public debate over Chessman's execution illustrated the specific influences shaping popular opposition to the death penalty in the postwar period.

Keywords:   American Revolution, Chessman, popular opposition, capital punishment, postwar period

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.