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A Critical History of Early RomeFrom Prehistory to the First Punic War$
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Gary Forsythe and John Connelly

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780520226517

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520226517.001.0001

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Rome's Conquest and Unification of Italy, 299–264 b.c.

Rome's Conquest and Unification of Italy, 299–264 b.c.

Chapter:
(p.324) Chapter 10 Rome's Conquest and Unification of Italy, 299–264 B.C.
Source:
A Critical History of Early Rome
Author(s):

Gary Forsythe

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520226517.003.0011

Livy's tenth book contains a detailed account of the first six years of the Third Samnite War. This book contains several episodes involving political disputes over the conduct of elections. The single most significant aspect of the Third Samnite War was the decision on the part of the Samnites to seek allies in order to strengthen their position against Rome. Its major and immediate consequence was its economic benefit to the Roman state in the form of booty and slaves. Rome's defeat of Pyrrhus was a clear declaration to the rest of the ancient Mediterranean world that the Romans had arrived on the world scene of warfare and power politics. The Roman organization of Italy is explained. Roman society was far more receptive of foreigners; and this social and political receptivity was chiefly responsible for Rome's lasting success as an imperial power.

Keywords:   Italy, Rome, Livy, Third Samnite War, Pyrrhus, Roman organization, warfare, power politics

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