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The Secular RevolutionPower, Interests, and Conflict in the Secularization of American Public Life$
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Christian Smith

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780520230002

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520230002.001.0001

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After the Fall: Attempts to Establish an Explicitly Theological Voice in Debates over Science and Medicine after 1960

After the Fall: Attempts to Establish an Explicitly Theological Voice in Debates over Science and Medicine after 1960

Chapter:
(p.434) 10 After the Fall: Attempts to Establish an Explicitly Theological Voice in Debates over Science and Medicine after 1960
Source:
The Secular Revolution
Author(s):

John H. Evans

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520230002.003.0010

This chapter examines the journey of the development of Science and Medicine, relating it to the understanding of the secularization theory. During the 1960s, Science came to be seen as producing a number of side-effects, such as environmental pollution and overpopulation, which were perceived to be the result of improving agriculture and medicine. Technological improvements suggested that humans could have a control over themselves. Scientists had full jurisdiction over promulgating the ethics of their own work. Following this, the second era began with giving up on an explicitly theological voice of ends, and fell back into having the ethics of science and medicine focusing on secularly stated ends that were translations of theological ends. This seed ironically grew into a challenge to the jurisdiction of theology, and the new profession of bioethics was born. As bioethicists gained strength, the theological challenge slowly receded, and this marked the third and the final era.

Keywords:   science, medicine, secularization, theological voice, bioethics

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