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Annihilating DifferenceThe Anthropology of Genocide$
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Alexander Laban Hinton

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780520230286

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520230286.001.0001

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Scientific Racism in Service of the Reich: German Anthropologists in the Nazi Era

Scientific Racism in Service of the Reich: German Anthropologists in the Nazi Era

Chapter:
(p.117) 5 Scientific Racism in Service of the Reich: German Anthropologists in the Nazi Era
Source:
Annihilating Difference
Author(s):

Gretchen E. Schafft

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520230286.003.0005

This chapter focuses on how Nazi anthropologists were deeply implicated in another form of manufacturing difference, namely the creation of the alleged “characteristics” of different social groups. It reveals that after World War II broke out, many Nazi anthropologists became even more intimately involved in the atrocities committed during the Holocaust. It also tries to determine why Nazi anthropologists participated in genocide, and suggests that anthropologists such as Eugon Fischer were partly driven by the desire for advancement and to continue doing scientific research.

Keywords:   Nazi anthropologists, alleged characteristics, social groups, genocide, Eugon Fischer, scientific research

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