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Strangers at the GatesNew Immigrants in Urban America$
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Roger Waldinger

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780520230927

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520230927.001.0001

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Progress, Decline, Stagnation?

Progress, Decline, Stagnation?

The New Second Generation Comes of Age

Chapter:
(p.272) Chapter 8 Progress, Decline, Stagnation?
Source:
Strangers at the Gates
Author(s):

Min Zhou

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520230927.003.0008

This chapter discusses the prospects of mobility for today's second generation. It determines that, in general, the second generation is exceeding the first on a number of indicators, such as high-school graduation rates. The chapter argues that ethnicity seems to be exerting its own effect, by accelerating upward progress for some while preventing mobility for others. Based on this argument, the discussion casts some doubt on the scenario of second generation decline. However, the author cautions that the population is diverse, which is evident in the mobility patterns. The chapter shows that groups which maintain a distinctive identity and social structures that promote continued cohesion have advantages in getting ahead.

Keywords:   mobility, second generation, ethnicity, decline, diverse population, mobility patterns, distinctive identity, social structures

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