Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
History DerailedCentral and Eastern Europe in the Long Nineteenth Century$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ivan Berend

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780520232990

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520232990.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use (for details see http://california.universitypressscholarship.com/page/535/privacy-policy-and-legal-notice).date: 11 December 2017

Introduction

Introduction

The Emerging West as an Ideal and Model for the East

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
History Derailed
Author(s):

Ivan T. Berend

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520232990.003.0001

In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the Central and Eastern European elite, national prophet-poets, intellectuals, and enlightened aristocrats, looked to the West with the greatest admiration. From the late eighteenth century to the early twentieth, a series of Central and Eastern European political thinkers, poets, statesmen, and reformers closely watched the ideas and transformation of Western Europe. Most of the reform-oriented Central and Eastern European elite were convinced that the rise, the “century-long experience,” of Northwestern Europe offered a model to follow. They would have to educate themselves, set goals, implement the needed reforms, build the required institutions, and “adopt the norms of European life”.

Keywords:   Central Europe, Eastern Europe, Northwestern Europe, Western Europe, elite, political thinkers

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.