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SpymasterDai Li and the Chinese Secret Service$
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Frederic Wakeman

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780520234079

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520234079.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use (for details see www.california.universitypressscholarship.com/page/535/privacy-policy-and-legal-notice).date: 16 December 2018

Spying

Spying

Chapter:
(p.308) Chapter 22 Spying
Source:
Spymaster
Author(s):

Frederic Wakeman

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520234079.003.0022

This chapter evaluates the contribution of the Sino-American Cooperative Organization's (SACO) intelligence gathering and guerrilla army in the war against the Japanese. It comments on claims about the success of SACO and on Milton Miles' select examples of SACO derring-do. It highlights historians' conclusion that the Allied war effort did not benefit much from this joint endeavour because the war ended just when SACO began to get ready to convert its focus from training to operation. It was Dai Li's own clandestine empire which benefited considerably from the combined Sino-American covert activities enabling the Chinese secret service chief to emerge from the Second World War much stronger than when the Japanese invasion was first launched.

Keywords:   SACO, guerrilla army, Japanese, Milton Miles, Allied war, Dai Li, Chinese secret service

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