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Fire in California's Ecosystems$
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Neil Sugihara

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780520246058

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520246058.001.0001

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Fire and Fuel Management

Fire and Fuel Management

Chapter:
(p.444) chapter 19 Fire and Fuel Management
Source:
Fire in California's Ecosystems
Author(s):

Sue Husari

H. Thomas Nichols

Neil G. Sugihara

Scott L. Stephens

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520246058.003.0019

This chapter presents an overview of basic fuel management concepts. It discusses the setting in which fuel management programs operate within the various land management agencies and fire departments in California’s diverse wildfire environment. Fuel characteristics that are typically manipulated are fuel quantity, fuel size, packing ratio, surface fuel, crown fuel, horizontal fuel continuity, vertical fuel continuity and ladder fuel. Mechanical fuel treatments include forest thinning, mastication, and grazing. The future of fuel management in California, and its implementation at a level of activity that significantly reduces hazardous amounts of wildland fuel and restores and maintains healthy ecosystems, will require state, local, and federal fire managers to work more closely with the citizens of California. The selection of fuel management techniques is further complicated by how the land is used and how many people live nearby.

Keywords:   fire, fuel management, California, wildfire environment, forest thinning, mastication, grazing

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