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A History of Modern Tibet, volume 2The Calm before the Storm: 1951-1955$
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Melvyn Goldstein

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780520249417

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520249417.001.0001

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Tibet Appeals to the United Nations

Tibet Appeals to the United Nations

Chapter:
(p.59) Chapter 3 Tibet Appeals to the United Nations
Source:
A History of Modern Tibet, volume 2
Author(s):

Melvyn C. Goldstein

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520249417.003.0004

The real hope of the Tibetan government was the United Nations. In November 1950, Tsipön Shakabpa forwarded Tibet's appeal to the United Nations' secretary-general. Tibet found support for its appeal from a most unlikely source — El Salvador. The draft resolution proposed by El Salvador asked not only for condemnation of the Chinese but also for the creation of a special committee to develop proposals for the United Nations regarding actions that could be taken. On the international front, these events compelled India, Britain, and the United States to weigh their own national interests carefully against their historical connections with Tibet and their moral and legal obligations to assist Tibet at this critical time.

Keywords:   Tsipön Shakabpa, China, United Nations, El Salvador, India, Britain, United States, Tibetan government

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