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Being ThereThe Fieldwork Encounter and the Making of Truth$
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John Borneman and Abdellah Hammoudi

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780520257757

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520257757.001.0001

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Institutional Encounters: Identification and Anonymity in Russian Addiction Treatment (and Ethnography)

Institutional Encounters: Identification and Anonymity in Russian Addiction Treatment (and Ethnography)

Chapter:
(p.201) Eight Institutional Encounters: Identification and Anonymity in Russian Addiction Treatment (and Ethnography)
Source:
Being There
Author(s):

Eugene Raikhel

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520257757.003.0008

This chapter compares typical experiences and practices of identification and anonymity in the state-run Addiction Hospital and the House of Recovery. “Identification” can refer both to the determination or recognition of “what a thing or a person is” and to “the becoming or making oneself one with another, in feeling, interest, or action.” This chapter focuses on both meanings and their relationship with one another. It begins with the Addiction Hospital, describing the institution and then shifts to the House of Recovery. In each case, it examines how the possibilities for self-identification were opened up or foreclosed by ascriptions of identity made by interlocutors, and how such opening up or foreclosure in turn shaped the mutual potential for identification with one another. Finally, it concludes with a brief consideration of identification and anonymity within ethnographic practices.

Keywords:   identification, anonymity, Addiction Hospital, House of Recovery, ethnographic practices

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