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Rallying for Immigrant RightsThe Fight for Inclusion in 21st Century America$
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Kim Voss

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520267541

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520267541.001.0001

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Regarding Family

Regarding Family

New Actors in the Chicago Protests

Chapter:
(p.161) 8 Regarding Family
Source:
Rallying for Immigrant Rights
Author(s):

Amalia Pallares

Nilda Flores-González

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520267541.003.0008

In spring 2006, immigrants and their supporters staged the largest mass mobilizations in Chicago’s history. This chapter examines the participation of new actors who united their voices with more seasoned activists to demand immigrant rights in Chicago. It argues that the conceptual framework guiding immigrant protests in Chicago was not a cohesive body of shared meanings that might characterize what we traditionally have considered social movements. Rather, this framework is best characterized as a set of common referents provided by the lived experiences of communities of immigrants, their non-immigrant family members, and Latinos at large. This chapter explores how the common referent of family has become a source of political identification and mobilization among mixed-status families and youth. The work presented here is part of the larger Immigrant Mobilization Project at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

Keywords:   Chicago, mass mobilizations, immigrants, immigrant rights, Latino, mixed-status families, Immigrant Mobilization Project, protests, social movements

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