Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
“HIV Is God's Blessing”Rehabilitating Morality in Neoliberal Russia$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jarrett Zigon

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780520267626

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520267626.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use (for details see www.california.universitypressscholarship.com/page/535/privacy-policy-and-legal-notice).date: 20 November 2018

Working on the Self

Working on the Self

Chapter:
(p.94) Six Working on the Self
Source:
“HIV Is God's Blessing”
Author(s):

Jarrett Zigon

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520267626.003.0007

This chapter deals with the particularities of the Church-run rehabilitation process, which emphasizes the need for the rehabilitants to do work on themselves. There is no quick fix for addiction: it is a time-consuming and difficult process of remaking oneself. In this view, a person does not overcome addiction; instead a new, unaddicted person must be made. This is a process that can be accomplished only by means of focused hard work and patience. Although this emphasis on the centrality of the individual is certainly true, a good deal of the success of rehabilitation depends on the work done by the family. It still remains largely a social process. Examining the tension between the individual and the social is vital for proper understanding of the moral approach of the Russian Orthodox Church in their fight against drug addiction and the spread of HIV. Secular therapeutics and traditional soviet practices involved in the process of working on the self are discussed. This mixing makes it clear that the Church-run program cannot be defined by a singular and totalizing morality, but is more productively considered a local moral and ethical assemblage of various aspects of diverse and conflicting moral discourses and ethical practices.

Keywords:   social process, moral approach, secular therapeutics, HIV, ethical practices

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.