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Abandoned in the HeartlandWork, Family, and Living in East St. Louis$
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Jennifer Hamer

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520269316

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520269316.001.0001

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“Around Here, Women Never Get Done Workin'”

“Around Here, Women Never Get Done Workin'”

Chapter:
(p.125) Chapter Five “Around Here, Women Never Get Done Workin'”
Source:
Abandoned in the Heartland
Author(s):

Jennifer F. Hamer

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520269316.003.0008

This chapter addresses the seemingly never-ending demands on East St. Louis women for the care of others. These women bathe, dress, and nurture children, grandchildren, and even great-grandchildren. It is shown that the life for African Americans in suburban space and place has differed markedly from that of their white counterparts. Then, it is noted that women make decisions about the care of others, work, and retirement, and that their own health is caught in the middle. Researchers suggest that married elderly women are happier and healthier than their single counterparts. Responsibilities to family do not end when children reach the age of eighteen, nor do they dissipate when women reach the age of retirement in their suburban place.

Keywords:   women, East St. Louis, African Americans, suburban space, suburban place, work, retirement, health

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