Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Contested IllnessesCitizens, Science, and Health Social Movements$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Phil Brown, Rachel Morello-Frosch, and Stephen Zavestoski

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520270206

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520270206.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use (for details see www.california.universitypressscholarship.com/page/535/privacy-policy-and-legal-notice).date: 23 April 2019

IRB Challenges in Community-Based Participatory Research on Human Exposure to Environmental Toxics

IRB Challenges in Community-Based Participatory Research on Human Exposure to Environmental Toxics

A Case Study

Chapter:
(p.245) 14 IRB Challenges in Community-Based Participatory Research on Human Exposure to Environmental Toxics
Source:
Contested Illnesses
Author(s):

Phil Brown

Rachel Morello-Frosch

Julia Green Brody

Rebecca Gasior Altman

Ruthann A. Rudel

Laura Senier

Carla Pérez

Ruth Simpson

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520270206.003.0014

This chapter outlines the challenges of obtaining institutional review board (IRB) coverage for community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects. Community-based participatory research focuses on problems that affect whole communities and thus is different from most biomedical research, which takes the individual as its primary subject. In CBPR projects, researchers work closely with community members and community-based organizations to develop appropriate research agendas, conduct analyses, and disseminate results and information. In general, IRBs are unfamiliar with this approach to research, reluctant to take responsibility for the actions of community partner organizations, and resistant to interaction between researchers and participants. Their hesitation causes significant delays and may prevent effective research and dissemination of results. The chapter then suggests concrete ways in which IRBs and funders can develop clear review guidelines that respect the unique qualities of CBPR.

Keywords:   institutional review board, community-based research, participatory research, biomedical research, community-based organizations

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.