Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Jazz BubbleNeoclassical Jazz in Neoliberal Culture$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dale Chapman

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780520279377

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520279377.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use (for details see www.california.universitypressscholarship.com/page/535/privacy-policy-and-legal-notice).date: 22 October 2018

“Homecoming”

“Homecoming”

Dexter Gordon and the 1970s Fiscal Crisis in New York City

Chapter:
(p.65) Chapter 2 “Homecoming”
Source:
Jazz Bubble
Author(s):

Dale Chapman

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520279377.003.0003

The ecstatic reception that greeted Dexter Gordon upon his return to New York in 1976 stood in contrast to the air of pessimism that befell the city as it confronted the decade’s fiscal crisis. Many of the city’s problems derived from a systemic disinvestment in those communities made most vulnerable by the specter of municipal default. Nevertheless, during this period, New Yorkers viewed their city’s failings largely through the lens of cultural crisis. In this context, chapter 2 situates Gordon’s return in relation to more negative discourses about punk, disco, and contemporary popular music. The period provides us with a useful case study for understanding how arguments waged on the terrain of culture provide cover for strategies of fiscal austerity.

Keywords:   Dexter Gordon, fiscal crisis, austerity, New York, disco, punk

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.