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Jazz BubbleNeoclassical Jazz in Neoliberal Culture$
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Dale Chapman

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780520279377

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520279377.001.0001

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The “Yoshi’s Effect”

The “Yoshi’s Effect”

Jazz, Speculative Urbanism, and Urban Redevelopment in Contemporary San Francisco

Chapter:
(p.178) Chapter 6 The “Yoshi’s Effect”
Source:
Jazz Bubble
Author(s):

Dale Chapman

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520279377.003.0007

In a bid to atone for its midcentury actions, the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, beginning in the 1980s, set about planning a “jazz preservation district” to be located in the Fillmore neighborhood. Along with a program for small-business loans, the SFRA initiative originally took the form of a combined multiplex and jazz venue, pairing AMC Theaters with an outpost of the New York-based Blue Note club. While this first proposal was never realized, the SFRA did later succeed in launching a different mixed-use project that mixed affordable and market-rate housing with a branch of the Oakland-based Yoshi’s jazz club. Chapter 6 examines the economic and cultural challenges facing the Fillmore redevelopment district at the turn of the millennium.

Keywords:   speculative urbanism, Yoshi’s, Fillmore district, San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, Blue Note, AMC, community redevelopment agencies

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