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Making Los Angeles HomeThe Integration of Mexican Immigrants in the United States$
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Rafael "Alarcon, Luis Escala, Olga Odgers, and Roger Waldinger

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780520284852

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520284852.001.0001

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Theoretical Perspectives on Immigrant Integration

Theoretical Perspectives on Immigrant Integration

Chapter:
(p.11) Chapter 1 Theoretical Perspectives on Immigrant Integration
Source:
Making Los Angeles Home
Author(s):

Rafael Alarcón

Luis Escala

Olga Odgers

, Dick Cluster
Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520284852.003.0002

This chapter discusses the theoretical perspectives underlying the analysis of the process of immigrant integration. These perspectives can be classified into two broad categories: those that take social integration as the objective to be achieved, and those that emphasize the pursuit of models for the management of difference, which is seen as a central component of society. The first category is commonly labeled as assimilationism, while the second is associated with the multiculturalist perspective. The debate between assimilationism and multiculturalism in their various stands framed most discussions of the processes of immigrant integration into destination societies until the end of the twentieth century. However, more recently, new approaches have allowed further development of that debate.

Keywords:   immigrant integration, social integration, assimilationism, multiculturalism, destination societies

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