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Caught UpGirls, Surveillance, and Wraparound Incarceration$
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Jerry Flores

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780520284876

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520284876.001.0001

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Legacy Community School and the New Face of Alternative Education

Legacy Community School and the New Face of Alternative Education

Chapter:
(p.70) Chapter 3 Legacy Community School and the New Face of Alternative Education
Source:
Caught Up
Author(s):

Jerry Flores

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520284876.003.0004

Legacy is California’s newest version of “continuation” or alternative education. This school is housed in a World War II army barrack. Here, kids are searched, made to walk through metal detectors, placed on formal or informal probation, and subjected to perpetual contact with criminal justice agents. In this school we find the Recuperation Class. This class is a self-contained program for youth with “drug dependence and other behavioral issues.” Unlike the rest of the school, the local probation department directly funds this classroom. In this unique setting, the teacher provides instruction as the probation agent walks around, conducts random drug tests on students, questions youth about their behavior outside of school, and/or takes them directly to detention. Legacy school officials have granted this criminal justice agency unfettered access to their students in return for financial support. While the probation department refers to this well-intentioned process as providing wraparound services to students, I argue that this process resembles “wraparound incarceration” where students cannot escape the formal surveillance of institutions of confinement. In this institution, young women move back and forth between this school and secure detention.

Keywords:   School-to-Prison Pipeline, Wraparound Services, Wraparound Incarceration, Community Schools, Alternative Schools, Latina/os

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