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Caught UpGirls, Surveillance, and Wraparound Incarceration$
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Jerry Flores

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780520284876

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520284876.001.0001

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School, Institutionalization, and Exclusionary Punishment

School, Institutionalization, and Exclusionary Punishment

Chapter:
(p.93) Chapter 4 School, Institutionalization, and Exclusionary Punishment
Source:
Caught Up
Author(s):

Jerry Flores

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520284876.003.0005

In this chapter, I demonstrate how the treatment girls received at their “regular” schools puts them in situations that landed them back in detention. The challenges of attending school were exacerbated by the lack of positive support girls received from wraparound services once they left Legacy Community School. In fact, the little wraparound support they did receive, like probation supervision and electronic monitoring, actually made them targets for mistreatment at the hands of their peers and educational staff alike. Along with this, the girls were also stigmatized because of the time they spent at Legacy Community School and in El Valle Juvenile Detention Center. In Sandra’s case, those challenges proved too great, and she eventually ended up back in El Valle. Like at home, in detention, and at Legacy, the girls in my study continued to experience interpersonal violence at the hands of their peers, and they received little protection from school or criminal justice officials. Instead, they experienced institutional harassment and targeting shaped by administrators’ gendered and racialized perceptions of these young Latinas as gang members and criminals.

Keywords:   School-to-Prison Pipeline, Wraparound Services, Latina/os & Education, Secondary Education

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