Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Technology and the Search for Progress in Modern Mexico$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Edward Beatty

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780520284890

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520284890.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use (for details see http://california.universitypressscholarship.com/page/535/privacy-policy-and-legal-notice).date: 22 November 2017

Technology and the Emergence of Atraso, 1820–70

Technology and the Emergence of Atraso, 1820–70

Chapter:
(p.27) Two Technology and the Emergence of Atraso, 1820–70
Source:
Technology and the Search for Progress in Modern Mexico
Author(s):

Edward Beatty

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520284890.003.0002

This chapter surveys Mexico’s history of technology from independence, in 1820, to about 1870. Independence separated Mexico from its Spanish colonial power but also brought economic depression. This chapter surveys the literature on the nature and extent of this depression and suggests implications for technological innovation. It then examines three canonical technologies of the first industrial revolution: railroad transportation, inanimate power (especially water mills and steam engines), and the use of iron to manufacture tools and machinery. It turns finally to discuss Mexican conceptions of their nation’s “backwardness” (atraso) relative to the early industrializers in the North Atlantic.

Keywords:   Mexican independence, economic depression, transportation, water power and steam engines, iron and tools, backwardness

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.