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Blood and WaterThe Indus River Basin in Modern History$
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David Gilmartin

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780520285293

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520285293.001.0001

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Science, the State, and the Environment

Science, the State, and the Environment

Chapter:
(p.144) 5 Science, the State, and the Environment
Source:
Blood and Water
Author(s):

David Gilmartin

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520285293.003.0005

A new engineering approach to irrigation marked the last decades of the nineteenth century. This was the era in which engineers increasing sought to make use of water to maximize its command over “wasteland.” One result of this was the opening of the Punjab canal colonies, where previously uncultivated (or intermittently cultivated) lands were settled by agricultural colonization. This process went hand-in-hand with a systemic vision of the river basin, which underlay increasingly large projects for moving water from one tributary river to another. But continuing contradictions within British policy-and a political reliance on the genealogicallyimagined village-produced considerable friction and ultimately led to widespread protest against government policies in the early twentieth century.

Keywords:   water engineering, Punjab, canal colonies, agricultural colonization

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