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Ties That BindThe Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom$
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Tiya Miles

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780520285637

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520285637.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use (for details see http://california.universitypressscholarship.com/page/535/privacy-policy-and-legal-notice).date: 22 November 2017

Citizenship

Citizenship

Chapter:
(p.191) Epilogue Citizenship
Source:
Ties That Bind
Author(s):

Tiya Miles

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520285637.003.0012

This concluding chapter resumes the Shoeboots family story in the Dawes Allotment era of the 1890s, and analyzes Doll and Shoe Boots' youngest son's failed application for Cherokee citizenship. As more outsiders of various racial backgrounds crossed Cherokee borders, distinctions between former slaves of Cherokees, Afro-Cherokees, and newcomer blacks began to blur. The overwhelmed Cherokee government seized on a strategy that would strictly determine who had the right to settle on Cherokee land and practice the privileges of citizenship. However, the U.S. government was developing a policy that would further disempower the Cherokees and other Native nations. In 1887, the General Allotment Act was passed, which intended to dissolve Indian tribalism and foster assimilation into American society.

Keywords:   Dawes Allotment era, Cherokee citizenship, Cherokee borders, Afro-Cherokees, Cherokee government, General Allotment Act, Indian tribalism

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