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A State of MixtureChristians, Zoroastrians, and Iranian Political Culture in Late Antiquity$
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Richard E. Payne

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780520286191

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520286191.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.199) Conclusion
Source:
A State of Mixture
Author(s):

Richard E. Payne

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520286191.003.0006

This concluding chapter traces the development of the relationship between the Church of the East and the Iranian Empire, which took shape over the course of two centuries. It details how Christians were the unwavering allies of Iran, even potentially more committed to the Sasanian dynasty than the Iranian aristocrats who had abandoned Yazdgird III, the last king of kings. It also discusses the integration of Christian elites and institutions into the imperial network during the reign of Husraw II; East Syrian elites' participation in Iranian political culture; and how East Syrians were as much the heirs of Iran as were their Zoroastrian peers.

Keywords:   kings, Yazdgird III, Iranian Empire, Arab Muslims, conquest, Sasanian dynasty, Husraw II, East Syrians

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