Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Weight of ObesityHunger and Global Health in Postwar Guatemala$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Emily Yates-Doerr

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780520286818

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520286818.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use (for details see http://california.universitypressscholarship.com/page/535/privacy-policy-and-legal-notice).date: 21 November 2017

Conclusion

Conclusion

The Opposite of Obesity

Chapter:
(p.173) Conclusion
Source:
Weight of Obesity
Author(s):

Emily Yates-Doerr

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520286818.003.0008

The book concludes by examining how a group of committed Guatemalan nutritionists sought to redefine the standards of ideal weight by emphasizing the importance of fatness. Whereas the BMI situates thinness in opposition to obesity, these nutritionists positioned fatness as obesity’s opposite. While they associated obesity with metabolic illness, an increased reliance on processed foods, and the stress of urbanization, they used fatness to refer to a hearty, healthy appetite and a life in which balance was fluid and imprecise. Fatness did not reference weight, but the fullness experienced by finding deep pleasure, satisfaction, and richness in bodies and food. This focus on experiences and relations and not on quantities of calories or weight destabilized the dangerous practices of restrictive dieting; with fatness—a way of being that defied measurement—the commonly taught equation “input minus output = dietary balance” simply did not add up. Through this final examination of forms of health that cannot be quantified, the book makes a case for the value of anthropological approaches to knowledge-making in the fields of nutrition, medicine, and global health.

Keywords:   obesity, fatness, dieting, global health, ethnography, value, Guatemala

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.