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El MallThe Spatial and Class Politics of Shopping Malls in Latin America$
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Arlene Dávila

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780520286849

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520286849.001.0001

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The Immateriality of the Mall

The Immateriality of the Mall

Financial Regimes, Urban Policies, and the “Latin American Boom”

Chapter:
(p.17) One The Immateriality of the Mall
Source:
El Mall
Author(s):

Arlene Dávila

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520286849.003.0002

This chapter examines the three immaterial regimes—the development of real estate investment trusts, the rise of neoliberal urban planning in Latin America, and the ongoing boosterism, which maintained the two preceding processes—that have facilitated the construction of shopping malls throughout the world. The three sustained the acquisition of “footprints” while simultaneously downplaying the centrality of the material practice to the shopping mall industry. In particular, they transformed shopping malls into a primary space for investment and speculation, as well as a key “worlding” mechanism for branding a city's image. These developments led countries to compete against each other as the most “primed” for business and development.

Keywords:   immaterial regimes, shopping malls, footprints, material practice, mall industry, worlding mechanism

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