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Scratching Out a Living"Latinos, Race, and Work in the Deep South"$
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Angela Stuesse

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780520287204

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520287204.001.0001

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To Get to the Other Side

To Get to the Other Side

The Hispanic Project and the Rise of the Nuevo South

Chapter:
(p.68) 4 To Get to the Other Side
Source:
Scratching Out a Living
Author(s):

Angela Stuesse

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520287204.003.0004

This chapter centers on the B.C. Rogers Poultry recruitment of migrants as poultry workers amid claims that there are no jobs available in Mississippi due to technological innovations in the poultry industry from 1970 to 1990. B.C. Rogers Poultry employed between 3,000 and 4,000 Mexican workers to process fifty-four million pounds of chicken, which would be annually exported to Russia, the Middle East, and the Caribbean. By the 1990, the business expanded and began the Hispanic project, which employed around five thousand Cubans, Central Americans (Nicaraguan, and Honduran), and Caribbeans (Dominican, and Puerto Rican). The program made B. C. Rogers a leader in immigrant recruitment, as well as a model for other employers nationwide.

Keywords:   B.C. Rogers Poultry, Cubans, Central Americans, Caribbeans, Hispanic project, poultry workers, Mexican workers, immigrant recruitment

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