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Scratching Out a Living"Latinos, Race, and Work in the Deep South"$
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Angela Stuesse

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780520287204

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520287204.001.0001

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Pecking Order

Pecking Order

Latino Newcomers, Receptions, and Racial Hierarchies

Chapter:
(p.93) 5 Pecking Order
Source:
Scratching Out a Living
Author(s):

Angela Stuesse

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520287204.003.0005

This chapter addresses how the growing presence of Latino communities transformed social hierarchies of race in Mississippi. The immigrants' arrival reinforced a racialized system in which whiteness maintained its privilege if blackness stayed at the very bottom. White Americans reinforced their whiteness—an identity that provided them with resources, power, and opportunity—by ensuring that African Americans would remain “the defining other despite how much they conform to White standards.” This system incentivizes people of diverse backgrounds to invest in the workings of white supremacy in hopes of reaping its benefits at the expense of those identified as Black.

Keywords:   racialized system, whiteness, white supremacy, blackness, race, Latino communities, African Americans

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