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Women in Blue HelmetsGender, Policing, and the UN's First All-Female Peacekeeping Unit$
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Lesley J. Pruitt

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780520290600

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520290600.001.0001

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How the FFPU Began

How the FFPU Began

Chapter:
(p.27) 2 How the FFPU Began
Source:
Women in Blue Helmets
Author(s):

Lesley J. Pruitt

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520290600.003.0003

Chapter 2 shows how the FFPU emerged in UN peacekeeping through the work of several committed men and women working for the UN’s Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) and the Indian government, particularly the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) and Indian Police Service (IPS). Key actors, including Mark Kroeker, Kiran Bedi, and Seema Dundhia, acted as norm entrepreneurs, promoting the inclusion of women in peacekeeping and promoting the creation of all-female units as a practical way to achieve greater participation by women. This approach drew on India’s history of gendered approaches to policing. These initiatives inspired novel approaches to pursuing gender equity in UN peacekeeping.

Keywords:   United Nations (UN), Indian Police Service (IPS), Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), Mark Kroeker, Kiran Bedi, Seema Dundhia, norms, all-female formed police units (FFPUs), India

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