Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Calligraphic StateTextual Domination and History in a Muslim Society$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Brinkley Messick

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780520076051

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520076051.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 25 May 2022

Relations of Interpretation

Relations of Interpretation

Chapter:
(p.135) Chapter 7 Relations of Interpretation
Source:
The Calligraphic State
Author(s):

Brinkley Messick

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520076051.003.0008

This chapter is concerned with the division of interpretive labor between two categories of worldly interpreters. The main activity of the mufti is the writing of fatwas. A mufti is a type of Muslim jurist who delivers a nonbinding legal opinion known as a fatwa, exercising in the process the form of legal interpretation called ijtihad. The muftiship and the judgeship are distinguished in the shari'a manuals. While the mufti is sought out by single questioners for nonenforceable fatwas, a judge rules in contexts of two-party adversarial conflict, and his judgments are enforceable. The difference between a fatwa and a judgment is elaborated. Fatwas and judgments are interpretive reciprocals: they come to rest at opposed points on the same hermeneutical circle.

Keywords:   interpretive labor, mufti, fatwas, muftiship, judgeship, shari'a manuals, judgment

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.