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The Quintessential NaturalistHonoring the Life and Legacy of Oliver P. Pearson$
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Douglas Kelt and Deborah Kaspin

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780520098596

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520098596.001.0001

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Mammals, Amphibians, and Reptiles of the Bolivian High Andes: An Initial Comparison of Diversity Patterns in Polylepis Woodlands1

Mammals, Amphibians, and Reptiles of the Bolivian High Andes: An Initial Comparison of Diversity Patterns in Polylepis Woodlands1

MamíFeros, Anfibios, Y Reptiles De Los Altos Andes De Bolivia: Una ComparacióN Inicial De Patrones De Diversidad En Bosques De Polylepis

Chapter:
(p.241) Mammals, Amphibians, and Reptiles of the Bolivian High Andes: An Initial Comparison of Diversity Patterns in Polylepis Woodlands1
Source:
The Quintessential Naturalist
Author(s):

Teresa Tarifa

James Aparicio E.

Eric Yeensens

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520098596.003.0010

This chapter compares the diversity patterns of amphibians, reptiles, and mammals from a collection of specimens of the three groups in 11 Polylepis woodlands, to learn if they are similar to one another and if one taxonomic group could serve as an umbrella for the others in conservation planning. It finds a number of new distributional records for mammals, amphibians, and reptiles; new records for amphibians and reptiles are reported herein. The chapter observes that mammals are the most diverse, whereas amphibian and reptile diversities are low. It notes that none of the groups' diversities correlated with the others', suggesting that conservation areas should be selected based upon a variety of taxa rather than any single umbrella group.

Keywords:   diversity patterns, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, Polylepis woodlands, conservation planning, taxa

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