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Diaspora without HomelandBeing Korean in Japan$
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Sonia Ryang and John Lie

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780520098633

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520098633.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 27 January 2020

The Politics of Contingent Citizenship: Korean Political Engagement in Japan and the United States

The Politics of Contingent Citizenship: Korean Political Engagement in Japan and the United States

Chapter:
(p.147) 7. The Politics of Contingent Citizenship: Korean Political Engagement in Japan and the United States
Source:
Diaspora without Homeland
Author(s):

Erin Aeran Chung

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520098633.003.0008

Comparison between the Korean communities in Japan and the US concludes that the community in the former represents a highly assimilated, structurally foreign community, while in the latter, it represents a linguistically and culturally distinct, structurally incorporated community. This article appraises the dynamics of citizenship and identity politics of the Korean communities in these two countries. Although both countries share restrictive immigration policies, the US projects itself as a country of immigration, whereas Japan maintains closed-door policies toward immigrants and has the worst record in the industrialized world for accepting refugees. Japanese citizenship policies are among the most restrictive of advanced industrial democracies. Hence, a natural expectation would be to find a highly deprived Korean community in Japan with barely any political voice and a cohesive Korean-American community whose interests are represented in U.S. politics. The exact opposite of this inference, in real life, is inquired in this article.

Keywords:   citizenship, immigration policies, closed-door policies, inndustrial democracies, political voice

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