Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Inventing Human ScienceEighteenth-Century Domains$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christopher Fox, Roy Porter, and Robert Wokler

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780520200104

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520200104.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 31 July 2021

The Gaze of Natural History

The Gaze of Natural History

Chapter:
(p.112) Five The Gaze of Natural History
Source:
Inventing Human Science
Author(s):

Phillip Sloan

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520200104.003.0005

To understand the full importance of the revolution in the human sciences encompassed in the comment by Comte de Buffon, this chapter focuses on the concept of a “natural history” of the human species. To develop these claims, it initially explores the origins of the idea of a “natural history” of man in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, and displays the extension of this in the systematic work of the Swedish natural historian Carolus Linnaeus. The chapter then analyzes the character of Linnaeus's contemporary Buffon's self- conscious effort to construct an alternative “natural history” to that represented by the well-entrenched Linnaean program.

Keywords:   natural history, human species, Comte de Buffon, Carolus Linnaeus

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.