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The Last EmperorsA Social History of Qing Imperial Institutions$
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Evelyn Rawski

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780520212893

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520212893.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

The Court Society

The Court Society

Chapter:
(p.17) Chapter 1 The Court Society
Source:
The Last Emperors
Author(s):

Evelyn S. Rawski

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520212893.003.0002

This chapter on court society identifies several significant features of Qing rule that link the rulers to their non-Han predecessors. The Qing court and administration moved in seasonal rhythms between multiple capitals, located outside the Great Wall and in the North China plain, in order to maintain important linkages with Inner Asian allies and the Han Chinese population. Having created a Manchu identity for the northeastern tribes in the early seventeenth century, the rulers issued regulations governing hairdo, dress, language, and the martial arts, which defined and perpetuated the separate identity of the conquest elite. At the same time, Qing rulers created through the arts an image of cosmopolitan rulership to stress the spatial breadth and catholicity of the imperial charisma.

Keywords:   Qing rule, Qing court, Han Chinese, Great Wall, conquest elite

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