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The Culture of SectarianismCommunity, History, and Violence in Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Lebanon$
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Ussama Makdisi

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780520218451

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520218451.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 18 October 2019

“A Very Old Thing”

“A Very Old Thing”

Chapter:
(p.146) 8 “A Very Old Thing”
Source:
The Culture of Sectarianism
Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520218451.003.0008

This chapter focuses on how a knowledge of sectarianism as antimodern was produced—how and why the violence of modern sectarianism in Mount Lebanon was relegated to the domain of tribal fanaticism by Fuad Pasha and his European colleagues. It illustrates how Ottoman and European concerns and perceptions coalesced into a discourse of an avowedly antimodern sectarianism. The chapter shows how this discourse, which grew out of and justified the terror of punishment, imposed by the Ottoman state in Damascus, masked a final restoration of an elitist social order in Mount Lebanon and marked the end of a genuinely popular participation in politics.

Keywords:   sectarianism, antimodern, violence, Mount Lebanon, tribal fanaticism, Fuad Pasha, Damascus, final restoration, elitist social order, politics

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