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Weimar SurfacesUrban Visual Culture in 1920s Germany$
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Janet Ward

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780520222984

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520222984.001.0001

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Modern Surface and Postmodern Simulation

Modern Surface and Postmodern Simulation

A Retrospective Retrieval

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction Modern Surface and Postmodern Simulation
Source:
Weimar Surfaces
Author(s):

Janet Ward

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520222984.003.0001

The twentieth century of the western hemisphere will be evoked as the century in which content yielded to form, text to image, depth to façade, and Sein to Schein. Mass cultural phenomena have been growing in importance, taking over from elite structures of cultural expression to become sites where real power resides, and dominating ever more surely our social imaginary. The Germany of the 1920s proffers an impressive moment in modernity when surface values first ascended to become determinants of taste, activity, and occupation. Modernity's surfaces, entirely site-and-street-specific yet mobile and mobilizing, have been replaced by the statis of the fluid mobility granted to their own perception by the technologies of television, the VCR, the World Wide Web, and virtual reality.

Keywords:   façade, Sein, statis, Schein, Germany

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