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The City as SubjectSeki Hajime and the Reinvention of Modern Osaka$
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Jeffrey Hanes

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780520228498

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520228498.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Seki Hajime and Social Progressivism in Prewar Japan

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
The City as Subject
Author(s):

Jeffrey E. Hanes

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520228498.003.0001

Seki Hajime had a visionary plan to reinvent the city of Osaka, where he served benevolently from 1914 to 1935. He threw himself into the pursuit of urban social reform when he was named mayor, and by 1923 he had made residential reform the pillar of his urban social reformism, and the creation of working-class garden suburbs its central objective. To Seki, the city was a dynamic social organism whose development and well-being were predicated on the welfare of the classes, families, and other groups who inhabited it, while his adversaries, such as landowners and bureaucrats, treated it as an economic subject. Seki gained fame from his fight against capitalism and statism. He also fought mightily for metropolitan autonomy in the hope of freeing the municipal government to extend urban planning to Osaka's still-undeveloped hinterlands.

Keywords:   Seki Hajime, Osaka, city, capitalism, economic subject

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