Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The City as SubjectSeki Hajime and the Reinvention of Modern Osaka$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jeffrey Hanes

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780520228498

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520228498.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

The People’s National Economy

The People’s National Economy

Chapter:
(p.53) 2 The People’s National Economy
Source:
The City as Subject
Author(s):

Jeffrey E. Hanes

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520228498.003.0003

On New Year's Day 1900, Seki Hajime warned his countrymen to be prepared for the approaching dawn of the Pacific Age; his warning challenged the Meiji leaders to reassess the nation's developmental priorities. He called for a complete overhaul of the Japanese economy, and over the following decade, he committed himself to this grand objective. As a teacher, scholar, and government advisor, Seki endeavored to identify the most critical economic challenges facing Japan and re-conceptualized the Japanese economy as a people's national economy. To urge the Meiji leadership to shift the locus of national concern from polity to economy, he actively promoted the model of national economic policymaking invented by his mentors, the political economists of the German historical school.

Keywords:   Seki Hajime, Japanese economy, Meiji leadership, political economists

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.