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Empire at the MarginsCulture, Ethnicity, and Frontier in Early Modern China$
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Pamela KyleCrossley

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780520230156

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520230156.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

The Cant of Conquest: Tusi Offices and China’s Political Incorporation of the Southwest Frontier

The Cant of Conquest: Tusi Offices and China’s Political Incorporation of the Southwest Frontier

Chapter:
(p.135) 5 The Cant of Conquest: Tusi Offices and China’s Political Incorporation of the Southwest Frontier
Source:
Empire at the Margins
Author(s):

John E. Herman

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520230156.003.0006

This chapter examines several sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Chinese texts on Guizhou province to see how the evolution of Chinese knowledge of Guizhou and its inhabitants represented China's conquest and incorporation of this part of the Southwest Frontier. In traditional Chinese historiography, the rhetorical devices used to elucidate the ways in which the Chinese state extended its political control over frontier areas were for the most part self-validating. It looks at the beginnings of this transition from indirect to direct rule, as well as the transformation of tusi officials from independent frontier leaders to nominal Chinese officials.

Keywords:   Chinese texts, Guizhou province, Chinese historiography, Southwest Frontier

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