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Colored WhiteTranscending the Racial Past$
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David Roediger

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780520233416

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520233416.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 04 August 2021

Plotting against Eurocentrism: The 1929 Surrealist Map of the World

Plotting against Eurocentrism: The 1929 Surrealist Map of the World

Chapter:
(p.169) 10 Plotting against Eurocentrism: The 1929 Surrealist Map of the World
Source:
Colored White
Author(s):

David R. Roediger

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520233416.003.0010

This chapter introduces the 1929 surrealist map of the world as an early attempt to identify Eurocentrism as a problem and to project a “nonwhite” alternative. Geographers often refer to attempts to provide alternatives to imperialist projecting not as mappings but as “countermappings.” The surrealists' collective mapping project encouraged and even cultivated idiosyncrasy and inconsistency. The “Surrealist Map of the World” bears strong affinities to the brilliant “Destruction of a Map,” a 1978 collage by Haifa Zangana. Zangana's work boldly indicates that the labored and manly forces none too successfullly attacking the map are so musclebound by the trappings of a classical, Christian, and nationalist logic as to undermine their own effects. The 1929 surrealist remapping of the world demanded the active imagination of new worlds.

Keywords:   1929, Eurocentrism, Destruction of a Map, Haifa Zangana, remapping

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