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Heroes of EmpireFive Charismatic Men and the Conquest of Africa$
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Edward Berenson

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780520234277

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520234277.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

Henry Morton Stanley and the New Journalism

Henry Morton Stanley and the New Journalism

Chapter:
(p.22) One Henry Morton Stanley and the New Journalism
Source:
Heroes of Empire
Author(s):

Edward Berenson

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520234277.003.0002

Henry Morton Stanley's personal charisma developed only later in his life, not until the spring of 1890 when he returned home in apparent triumph from what would be his final African voyage. The Stanley-Livingstone meeting provided a spectacular occasion for a new kind of journalism. The crime story became the staple of the new journalism in France and the United States, its dominance such that the fait divers' distinctive style, with its dialogue, characters, action, suspense, and progression of events, would spill over into most other forms of reportage. The writings of Livingstone, Burton, and other travelers showed Stanley how to mount and conduct an expedition into the African interior. By the late 1880s, many would endorse the notion that Stanley resembled the mythic heroes whose courage and manly abilities provided models for contemporary men.

Keywords:   Henry Morton Stanley, Livingstone, African voyage, new journalism, France, United States

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