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Heroes of EmpireFive Charismatic Men and the Conquest of Africa$
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Edward Berenson

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780520234277

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520234277.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

Hubert Lyautey and the French Seizure of Morocco

Hubert Lyautey and the French Seizure of Morocco

Chapter:
(p.228) Seven Hubert Lyautey and the French Seizure of Morocco
Source:
Heroes of Empire
Author(s):

Edward Berenson

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520234277.003.0008

Hubert Lyautey, soon to become one of France's leading colonial actors and propagandists, began in the 1890s to seek the potential for national regeneration among those who served in colonies. Lyautey's eventual status as a colonial hero suggests that colonialism could command widespread interest in France. Morocco was a society at war with itself and with outsiders who sought to bring it peace. Lyautey's reputation as a pacific conqueror, a lithe duelist on the colonial stage, received another boost in December 1908 when the general's forces defeated the Beni Snassen tribal army in its mountainous homeland in northeastern Morocco. If Lyautey could defeat Moroccan barbarism with the promise of a humane, French peace, there was reason for confidence that other French generals—or perhaps Lyautey himself—would overcome German barbarism as well.

Keywords:   Hubert Lyautey, France, Morocco, Moroccan barbarism, German barbarism, French peace

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