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Song Loves the MassesHerder on Music and Nationalism$
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Johann Gottfried Herder and Philip V. Bohlman

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780520234949

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520234949.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 23 October 2019

Redemption through Sacred Song

Redemption through Sacred Song

Essay on Letter 46, Theologische Schriften (1780/81)

Chapter:
(p.186) 6. Redemption through Sacred Song
Source:
Song Loves the Masses
Author(s):

Philip V. Bohlman

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520234949.003.0012

Music, especially sacred song, was also a critical subject in Herder’s professional life as a theologian and pastor in Weimar, the center of the German Enlightenment. Chapter 6 is an epistolary essay, in which Herder circulates thoughts about the ways in which song shapes the history, character, and national traits of a people. Beginning with Classical Greek and Roman vocal and poetic traditions, Herder traces the role of sacred song through different national traditions to the modern publications of song in England and the German lands. He concludes with a set of exegetical reflections on Handel’s Messiah as the epitome of sacred music.

Keywords:   Epic, Epistolary writing, Fragments, George Fredric Handel, Hymnody, Messiah, Moral philosophy, Sacred song, Theology

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