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The Tragic Tale of Claire Ferchaud and the Great War$
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Raymond Jonas

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780520242975

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520242975.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

The Great War in the European Imagination

The Great War in the European Imagination

Chapter:
(p.1) The Great War in the European Imagination
Source:
The Tragic Tale of Claire Ferchaud and the Great War
Author(s):

Raymond Jonas

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520242975.003.0001

Claire Ferchaud was born in west France on May 5, 1896. Although there was nothing special about her birth or her early youth, her modest origins made her ascent more spectacular. By the end of 1916, in the midst of the First World War, Claire was compared to Joan of Arc. Claire's visions made her a regional and national celebrity as she promised victory for France. This book focuses on how Claire Ferchaud came to stand in front of the president of the French Republic at the height of the crisis of the Great War. It discusses the forces that drove her mission. It is also about Claire's skillful use of those forces as she campaigned for national consecration and redemption which would lead to the victory of France in an interminable war.

Keywords:   Claire Ferchaud, France, First World War, Joan of Arc, national consecration, visions

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