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The Final Victim of the BlacklistJohn Howard Lawson, Dean of the Hollywood Ten$
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Gerald Horne

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780520243729

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520243729.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.262) (p.263) Conclusion
Source:
The Final Victim of the Blacklist
Author(s):

Gerald Horne

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520243729.003.0015

John Howard Lawson's body had been “savagely attacked” by the ravages of time, which left him in ill humor. He died by August 1977. The posthumous assault on Lawson was of a piece with the continuing assault on writers—notably screenwriters—a process he had contributed exceedingly to combating. A major problem faced by screenwriters today is that the fighting union that Lawson had helped to build is today a shadow of its former self. The demise of Red Hollywood meant that Liberal Hollywood had to take the uncomfortable position of being the prime target of conservatives. The tragedy of John Howard Lawson and Red Hollywood alike was not only what befell him and his comrades but what befell the nation in which he was born, when he was deprived of the opportunity to comment on—and influence—his society, his roots, his country.

Keywords:   John Howard Lawson, screenwriters, Red Hollywood, Liberal Hollywood, conservatives

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